THE PILGRIM’S WAY

PART 3

KELTY TO NOWHERE

The decision to take on the next section of the Pilgrim’s way was made somewhat hastily, and with an over reliance on the weather forecast. 20% risk of rain it said. We got the lot as the day progressed. One of those very, very wet days by the time the walk was finished……

In fairness, I have to admit we’d gone wrong before we’d started. On the previous leg, we saw none of the Pilgrim’s Way badges when we exited from the St Ninians open cast site, and turned right to head towards Kelty. Wrong. The Way turns left and leads (we think) through forestry and recreational areas to north of the road leading up to the Perth and Kinross border, which explains the lack of Pilgrim badges on the main road into Kelty.

However, we refuse to believe the rumours of P and K Border police defending the borders from rampaging Fifers sweeping down on Loch Leven. As a result of the walk on the day, I tried that map again. Look hard enough, and it suggests the route, but not at all precisely. We suspect it goes through Kelty and comes in from the north. We saw the signs when we got to the entry for Lochore meadows.

So we left the car in the Main Street and wandered through to Lochore Meadows Country Park. We in this instance was Neil and I plus other halves: Neil’s Mo and my carol were looking for exercise. Foolish people.

A different map……….

A different map……….

The dark glasses (Mo) failed to encourage the sun….

The dark glasses (Mo) failed to encourage the sun….

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So we walked up from Kelty and posed for photos. We also caught sight of the first Pilgrim’s Way markers, on the Kinross road from the north. Not the way we had come. The implication was that the route had come through or round Kelty itself.

And walked into the country park. The drizzle was getting heavier…..

Mo and Carol “enjoying the weather”

Mo and Carol “enjoying the weather”

His Geordie Sogginess, Neil Ist

His Geordie Sogginess, Neil Ist

The boating area with seagull

The boating area with seagull

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The way into the park is along a cinder path through scrub, the tell-tale signs of nature taking over lost industry. As if that wasn’t obvious. The area is as usual a mining area although the reality of the place is that it is a good recreational area, plenty of open spaces and considerable opportunities for cycling and water sports. And walking through. So we were getting wet, the canoeist flotilla was sheltering under trees and there was a degree of hurry up going on with the cyclists.

Whist at times the sun was trying, it was good to see on the horizon that area of Lochore Meadows which is the boating area and the Visitor Centre and Cafe. Which is pretty damn good especially on wet Sunday afternoons.

The view across the loch to surf paddling etc was at least some entertainment, and above our heads the timeline was, well, interesting.l

The timeline is probably fairly both typical and typical of the history of mines across the Central Belt of Scotland, The one in the cafe which is duplicated on the website summarises the story of the people of the area.